Archive for May 8th, 2009

May 8, 2009

Where the Wild Things Are

by Emma

I want to see this with your hand in my hand.

May 8, 2009

The Fall

by Emma

So beautiful: colours and the sweetest little gypsy girl who broke her arm.

May 8, 2009

MUNAY-KI

by Emma

(A late night stumbling upon, so much is coming, emerging, submerging. Maybe you know it well maybe not. Beautiful, terrifying, intense)

The Munay-Ki are the nine great rites of initiation of the medicine way. The word munay means “I love you” or “BE AS THOU ART.” The Munay-Ki are the nine gates that heal us and transform our human energy field into that of homo luminous.

The prophecies of the ancient Americas speak about a new human appearing on the planet – one who lives free of fear and resides in his or her transcendent nature. The Munay-Ki are the codes for the new human. They are delivered in the form of energetic transmissions. The ninth rite, the “Creator Rite” was transmitted for the first time in the summer of 2006 at the Holy Mountains in the Andes. The nine initiations of the Munay-Ki have only been available until recently to the high wisdom keepers of the Americas.


May 8, 2009

Glorious Woodcutting

by Emma

http://yra.no/index.php?s=art_sculpture

So nice so beautiful: Conversations with Trees.
Yes please.
May 8, 2009

Yoko Ono inspired by Japanese Gutai movement

by Emma

The Gutai Manifesto

Yoshihara wrote the manifesto for the Gutai group in 1956. The full text of the “Gutai Manifesto” is available in English at the website of Japan’s Ashiya City Museum of Art & History [2]. Among its preoccupations, the manifesto expresses a fascination with the beauty that arises when things become damaged or decayed. The process of damage or destruction is celebrated as a way of revealing the inner “life” of a given material or object:

“Yet what is interesting in this respect is the novel beauty to be found in works of art and architecture of the past which have changed their appearance due to the damage of time or destruction by disasters in the course of the centuries. This is described as the beauty of decay, but is it not perhaps that beauty which material assumes when it is freed from artificial make-up and reveals its original characteristics? The fact that the ruins receive us warmly and kindly after all, and that they attract us with their cracks and flaking surfaces, could this not really be a sign of the material taking revenge, having recaptured its original life?….” [3]